FAQ

Updated answers are still in progress.

Do I have to file my Federal and State Returns together?

Most states allow you to file your State Return separately from your Federal Return so long as your Federal Return has already been accepted by the IRS, although there are a few states that have more specific requirements. For more information: http://igotmyrefund.com/forums/topic/file-federal-state-returns-together/

What can my Transcripts tell me?

There are several different types of transcripts that can either be viewed online or mailed to you. The two types that we will focus on for seeing where you're at with processing are tax Return Transcript and Tax Account Transcript.
  • The Tax Return Transcript will show lines from the original tax return (1040, 1040A, 1040EZ) you filed. (AGI, Credits, etc) along with any schedules or forms you filed. It will not show any adjustments made with an Amended Return (1040X). This transcript will only generate once you have processed. It is the most common transcript used as proof of income in lending for things like mortgages and student loans. Note: This transcript typically becomes available after the Tax Account Transcript is finished.
  • The Tax Account Transcript shows basic information such as marital status, AGI, income, etc. It will also show any changes made to your account (amended return). What makes the account transcript important to figuring out the processing timeline is the codes than may appear on it. Each code can give you more information to what is going on with your refund and can even help you figure out when you may be able to expect your direct deposit (DD). The most important code that will signify your refund has been approved is "846" (refund release). If your account transcript has the "846" code then you can also use the cycle code to determine your direct deposit date (DDD). Note: This transcript typically becomes available before the Tax Return Transcript.
Things to remember:
  1. The IRS has updated their security measures in order to view transcripts online. An account will need to be made and certain security questions will veend to be answered and verified.
  2. If you are unable to view your transcripts online, then there is no way to say for sure that you will have a DDD soon. Although it is generally a good sign that things are moving along if you can order them, there is a chance that the transcripts have not finished updating and can be sent out containing no information.
  3. Generally once you are able to access both of these transcripts, then WMR should update the next day with more information. (Please refer back to #2)
For more information visit the links below.
  • Codes and Errors http://igotmyrefund.com/irs-transaction-codes-and-error-codes/
  • Cycle Dates http://igotmyrefund.com/irs-transaction-codes-and-error-codes/
  • IGMR Transcript Group http://igotmyrefund.com/irs-transaction-codes-and-error-codes/
  • Where to get Transcripts https://www.irs.gov/individuals/get-transcript

What is an IP PIN?

IP PINs are used when ID theft has been reported to the IRS. This is different than an e-file PIN.

What is an e-file PIN?

An e-file PIN is used before you submit your return to the IRS. If you don;t have an e-file PIN, you can use the prior years Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) to submit your return.

Does the IRS need my W-2 to process my return?

All employer's are required to have W-2 forms sent to them by January 31, but they may also ask for a 30 day extension. If your employer does not provide you with a W-2 then you may request a substitute from W-2 with form 4852.

What is the difference between Child Tax Credit and Additional Child Tax Credit?

The difference between CTC and ACTC has been a top question lately.  Let's try to clear this up... There are differences between the child tax credit (CTC), the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) and the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). In a nutshell, the EITC is not “related” to the CTC or the ACTC. But the CTC is related to the ACTC. They are each calculated differently and not all of them are refundable. The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit based on income, which as the name implies is based on “Earned Income”. Note that there are different types of income and not all, for example Social Security income, is considered earned. Both individuals with and without children qualify for this credit, however there is a maximum income to receive the EITC and the amount of the credit increases based on the number of dependents. There are rules to determine who qualifies as a dependent: http://igotmyrefund.com/earned-income-tax-credit-qualifying-child-rules/ The guidelines for a qualifying child are generally easy to understand, but in some cases, for example in a divorce, custody rules for EITC can be confusing – and oftentimes debatable between parents. So, the actual amount of the credit will depend on your earned income (these limits change each year and whether you have qualified dependents. Here are the 2016 limits: https://www.irs.gov/credits-deductions/individuals/earned-income-tax-credit/eitc-income-limits-maximum-credit-amounts) The Child Tax Credit (CTC) is called a “partially” refundable tax credit, you must have a qualified dependent (age limits are different than the EITC); however the amount is up to $1000 for each dependent. It can be claimed only if you have a child, different from the EITC in that regard. How this credit works is that it can reduce a tax liability (say you end up owing 300), claiming the CTC will reduce that amount to zero. It is related to, but often confused with the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC). The Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) is refundable like the EITC, but unlike the CTC. It is the refundable portion of the CTC so to speak. The ACTC amount is related to the CTC in that it is calculated when you claim the CTC, hence the name “additional” child tax credit and the difference is the portion refundable. There are income minimums (set each year) and is calculated differently if you have 3 or more dependents. Essentially, the ACTC reduces the portion of CTC that is refundable. Refunds are ONLY being delayed for tax returns that claimed EITC and/or ACTC.  Here is more information about the Tax Refund Delay due to the PATH Act.  We are not tax professionals and always recommend seeking the advice of one; or, plugging your numbers in to one of the companies like TurboTax who will auto-magically calculate everything for you.  We hope this helps clear up the difference between the CTC and ACTC.    

What is a cycle date and what does it mean?

What is a cycle date? A cycle date can be found on a completed transcript that has the 846 refund release code. The cycle date reflects the date the transaction is posted to the master file. Ok, but what does it mean? A cycle date will be designated by an eight digit number indicating the year, week and day of the week. (YYYYWWDD) Ok, but I still don't know what that means... Let's break it down some more: -First four numbers indicate year. -Next two numbers indicate week of the year -Last two numbers indicate day of the week. Each days is designated by a two digit number which excludes Saturday and Sunday.  
  • Friday= 01
  • Monday= 02
  • Tuesday=03
  • Wednesday=04
  • Thursday=05
  I think I’m starting to get it, but maybe you can give me an example? Cycle date: 20170505 Year: 2017 Week: 05 Day: 05 Wednesday of the 4th week of 2017 Actual date: February 2, 2017 Ok I get it now, but can that tell me when I should get my refund? If you have the Refund Release Code (846) then you can figure out your DDD. To figure it out add four business days to the cycle date. For checks mailed add six business days to the cycle date. Source: IRS Manual Part 3. Submission Processing Chapter 30. Work Planning and Control Section 123. Processing Timeliness: Cycles, Criteria and Critical Dates IMF Daily Processing 3.30.123.4.9 (updated 01-01-2017)

What is the PATH Act and how does it affect my return?

PATH Act – Protecting America from Themselves and Early Tax Refunds

PATH ActJust kidding, that’s really not the name of the new law which took affect in 2017.

But what is this new law anyway? It’s called the PATH Act.  The “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015” is part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016 enacted on December 18, 2015.  It has hundreds of provisions unrelated to an actual tax refund delay. There is one that particularly affects the way tax returns will be processed by the IRS.  It is part of “program integrity” provisions that were designed to help reduce fraudulent and improper refunds.  It changes when refunds will be released if the Earned Income Tax Credit or Additional Child Tax Credit is claimed. It requires that:
Effective for credits or refunds made after Dec. 31, 2016, no credit or refund for an overpayment for a tax year will be made to a taxpayer before the 15th day of the second month following the close of that tax year (generally February 15 of the following year), if the taxpayer claimed the EITC or additional child tax credit on the tax return. (Code Sec. 6402(m) as amended by Act Sec. 201(b) and Act Sec. 201(d)(2))

In the case you are insanely bored and want to read the actual PATH Act language…

Or if you are a nerd like some of us who sit and read actual laws, we fired up the Google machine to find the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016 which contains the PATH Act. If anyone wants to read a 900+ page piece of legislation to look at the PATH integrity provisions, by all means–go at it.  The meat of it is in the EARLIEST DATE FOR CERTAIN REFUNDS on Page 836.  Don’t want to read or scroll, Search for 26 USC 6402.
“….No credit or refund of an overpayment for a taxable year shall be made to a taxpayer before the 15th day of the second month following the close of such taxable year if a credit is allowed to such taxpayer under section 24 (by reason of subsection (d) thereof) or 32 for such taxable year. …”
The provision that makes a change to the way early filers are used to seeing refunds deposited can be tied to Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) recommendations (butt chewings) given to the IRS in recent years.  TIGTA evaluates the IRS handling of tax returns.  And they have had there fair share of kicks in the ass in the past several years.

If you are worried about the PATH Act, we say don’t.

This should only affect people who file early in January and February. “Should” is the operative word here. Tax refunds do usually come in under 21 days, yeah you know the speech (really… they do). So even if you file early in the last week of January or first two weeks of February, your refund could very well be released in that timeframe.  

What is the difference between IRS accepted and approved?

The IRS ACCEPTED status on Where's My Refund (WMR) means your "return has been received and that it seems to have passed a basic check for completeness."  During the basic check, the IRS also looks for red flags such as fraud indicators. "Accepted" is usually the 1st status most taxpayers will see when they check the WMR, unless the tax return has been rejected.  We wrote more here about rejected returns. The initial basic review when you file your tax return includes checks by the IRS for things like whether your social security number has already been used and if forms/fields not completed or are missing. There are also other basic checks that the IRS uses. After this, your return will be processed and the next status is usually that a refund has been approved. The APPROVED status on Where My Refund indicates your "return has been processed and a refund is approved." "Approved" is usually the 2nd status taxpayers will see when they check the WMR if they are due a refund.  The status when your refund is approved will display a date that you can expect to receive a refund. You may see these terms used on the IRS Where’s My Refund website or the IRS2Go App. Also, tax filing companies such as H&R Block and TurboTax use similair terms to describe your return status on their websites, emails and text message updates.            

What happened with Turbo Tax and Form 8692?

During the early test batch Turbo Tax was made aware of  the Form 8692 popping up on some of their customers returns while they were filing and it wouldn't let them continue past this form and it wasn't needed, at first Turbo Tax tried getting the customers to delete this form, but some found this option difficult and confusing, so they started telling them to just leave lines blank or to place zeros, after entering this info they were able to continue filing. However once they were accepted by the IRS  and started processing through the system the returns started getting rejected. The production logs state they had a fix in place as of 1/22/2015. So we are hopeful this issue has been resolved. There were additional concern about people using other tax companies to refile instead of staying with Turbo Tax  even though they were told by turbo tax their returns would be automatically resubmitted which could result in 2 returns being submitted. These people were concerned about this and we have been informing them if one goes in first the other return should be rejected. We were also made aware of a potential problem by our administrator's source within the IRS of another issue with Form 8680 Here is the link:   Info Here

How do I order transcript for tax return?

IRS Transcripts can be ordered by phone or online.  The IRS can provide an account or return transcript to you by mail or online. The phone number to order IRS Transcripts is (800) 908-9946 and allows you to order account transcripts or return transcripts. To order a tax return transcript or tax account transcript online visit the IRS.gov website here:  Order IRS Transcript

What is the difference between daily and weekly accounts

The difference between IRS daily and weekly accounts is when information posts to your account.  According to the IRS Manual, our users have read that daily accounts post within 4 days and weekly account post within 7 days. Most taxpayers will fall into the daily “accelerated” processing. If you are in a weekly account, your refund will “post” within a week of being accepted and your DDD will be scheduled for the following Thursday. Account conditions that prevent accounts from being marked daily are conditions such as (list is not all inclusive): 1. ITIN Accounts 2. Foreign Addresses 3. Campus Addresses 4. Identity Theft Indicators 5. Prisoner File 6. Related MFT 31 Account (e.g., Bankruptcy, Offer-In-Compromise, Installment Agreements, Innocent Spouse) 7. Criminal Investigation Activity 8. Civil Penalty Account (MFT 55) 9. Tax Module History (two years prior) with CI, Exam or Collection Activity Answered provided by Moderator Steph 226  POSTED FEB. 05,2014  

What is Tax Topic 152

Tax Topic 152 from the IRS is a code you might see when you check the status of your refund with the Where's My Refund (WMR) tool at the irs.gov website.  It is not an audit...chill.  What does IGMR think?  It's a default processing message that appears while your return is processed. No worries. Some people believe you get Tax Topic 152 just before you get approved for a direct deposit date (DDD), and some people receive this as soon as they get their status update on the WMR (Where's My Refund) which shows their return was received, but whichever way you get it here is what the IRS.GOV says about it: Tax Topics - Topic 152 Refund Information
Topic 152 - Refund Information There are three options for receiving your federal individual income tax refund:
  • The fastest way is by direct deposit (electronic funds transfer) into your checking or savings account, including an individual retirement arrangement (IRA);
  • By purchase of U.S. Series I Savings Bonds; or
  • By paper check sent to the address listed on your return.
If you choose to receive your refund by direct deposit, there is an option to split your refund into as many as three separate accounts. For example, you can request that we directly deposit into a checking, a savings and a retirement account by completing Form 8888 (PDF), Allocation of Refund (Including Savings Bond Purchases) and attaching it to your income tax return. This option is not available if you file Form 8379 (PDF), Injured Spouse Allocation. As a reminder, your refund should only be directly deposited into accounts that are in your own name, your spouse’s name or both if it’s a joint account. Please note, to receive your refund by direct deposit (whether into one account or more), the total refund amount must be $1.00 or more. In an effort to combat fraud and identity theft, the IRS limits the number of direct deposits into a single financial account or prepaid debit card to three refunds per year. Taxpayers who exceed this limit will receive refund checks. Refunds for electronically filed returns process within 21 days of the e-file acceptance date. Refunds from mailed paper returns process within six to eight weeks from the date the IRS receives it. Even though the IRS issues more than 9 out of 10 refunds in less than 21 days, incomplete or inaccurate tax returns may require further review and could take longer than the normal processing time. IRS representatives can research the status of your return only if it has been:
  • More than 21 days since you received your e-file acceptance notification,
  • More than 6 weeks since you mailed your paper return, or
  • If Where’s My Refund? directs you to contact us.
Where’s My Refund? has the most up to date information available about your refund. Use it to get your personalized refund status. The tool is updated once a day so you don't need to check more often. You can also download our free mobile app, IRS2Go, from an iPhone or Android device. Both are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can start checking on the status of your return within 24 hours after we have received your e-filed return or 4 weeks after you mail a paper return. Have your 2014 tax return handy so you can provide your Social Security number, your filing status and the exact whole dollar amount of your refund shown on your return. If you don't have Internet access, you may call the refund hotline at 800-829-1954. Where’s My Refund? includes information for the most recent tax year filed in the current year and does not include information about amended returns. To check the status of an amended return, use Where’s My Amended Return? on IRS.gov. The Where’s My Refund? tool includes a tracker that displays progress through 3 stages: (1) Return Received, (2) Refund Approved and (3) Refund Sent. Where’s My Refund? will provide an actual personalized refund date as soon as the IRS processes your tax return and approves your refund. Where’s My Refund? provides the most accurate and complete information we have. Unless Where’s My Refund? tells you to call, there’s no need. Updates to refund status are made no more than once a day - usually at night. Processing times may take longer under the following circumstances:
  • Refunds from amended returns, generally issued within 12 weeks.
  • Injured spouse claims. Refer to Topic 203 for more information about injured spouse claims.
  • Refund claims with an application for an individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN) attached. Refer to Topic 857 for more information about ITINs.
You can also refer to Topic 303 for a checklist of common errors when preparing your tax return and for additional items that may delay the processing of your return. If you receive a refund to which you are not entitled, or for an amount that is more than you expected, do not cash the check until you receive a notice that explains the difference; then follow the instructions on the notice. However, if you receive a refund for a smaller amount than you expected, you may cash the check. If it is determined that you should have received more, you will later receive a check for the difference. You will also get a notice explaining the difference. Follow the instructions on the notice. In the event that your refund check is lost, stolen or destroyed, the IRS will help you in obtaining a replacement check.

A refund date will be provided when available. What does that mean?

There is much speculation about the "A refund date will be provided when available" message you may see when your check your Where's My Refund (WMR) status.  Taxpayers report seeing the message when the graphic image of the WMR bars disappeared.  In 2015, an IGMR user posted the following comment; however, we were able to confirm their identity and the information may still be just a guess or tall tale.  You be the judge.
Name: Official Submitted on 2015/01/16 at 9:41 pm I can not give my name, but to shed a little light on every one. Our test batch consisted of 35,000 efiled returns. Every last test batch return has to be done processing before opening day and issued ddd’s to clear the system for incoming returns. If your bar has dissappered yu are completely processed so no worries. If your bar and return amount has dissappered either your being reviewed, have an offset or owe an debt.

Does Where’s My Refund always display my refund status with the tracker showing three steps?

No. In some cases the tracker graphic will not be shown if your return is being reviewed prior to step two: “Refund Approved,” and instead an explanation or instructions will be provided depending on the situation. This can happen even if you previously checked Where’s My Refund and it showed the status as “Return Received” along with the tracker. In these cases be assured that we have your tax return and we are processing it. Please follow the directions provided by Where’s My Refund?. Otherwise if we need more information we will contact you – usually by mail. If we send you a letter about your return, please follow the instructions in the letter as soon as possible.

This does not mean an audit.  Reviewed can also mean processing.

What if I haven’t received my 1098T yet?

You should receive your 1098T by February 15th. If you haven’t received it by then you should contact your college or university.

How can I verify my identity if I got a 4884C/5071C notice?

You may verify it by calling or via IRS website.   https://idverify.irs.gov/IE/e-authenticate/welcome.do

How long should I wait to check my tax return status?

E-file: 72 hours Mail: 4 weeks

How quickly will I get my refund?

There are many variables that affect this: including when you file, whether or not there are errors in your return, processing time, and delivery time.

Will calling the IRS give me additional information or speed my refund?

Calling the IRS will not speed up your refund because the representatives on the phone for the IRS are not the people who process the returns. But you may be able to get more information if your refund is delayed since the WMR seems to be hit or miss or might be producing a code or message indicating that you should call.

What might cause a taxpayer’s return to take longer to process?

There are many reasons your tax return could be taking longer to process than you expected.  Some of the common errors are simple mistakes.  For example, your tax return could be slow to process because of incorrect social security number(s) for any of the joint taxpayers or dependents listed on your return, incorrect address, incorrect bank information (e.g., routing numbers, account numbers), if you use direct deposit.)

What is the IRS Processing Cycle?

The cycle in which the Martinsburg Computing Center (MCC) posts returns processed by campus and selects returns. The cycle is expressed by a six digit code. The first four digits represent the file year, the second two digits represent the week of that file year (e.g., Cycle 201204 is the fourth week of the 2012 file year).

What does it mean when people say they are “ghosts”?

Jenny on March 7, 2012 at 9:25 am. “Ghost” means that the IRS reps say the IRS has no record of you – that you don’t exist in their system. There were many “ghosts” here in February. One posted as “Casper’ :)

Has anyone received refund without the WMR being updated?

Yes, we have has reports from a few people that they received their refund and the WMR never updated from the 'being processed" message. Though it has happened, it doesn't seem to be the trend; most people get a hard direct deposit date as an indicator that they are finally through this nonsense.

Who is SBBT?

Santa Barbara Bank and Trust (SBBT) is one of the banks used by Turbo Tax for refund processing if you chose to have TurboTax deduct their fees from your refund. (Meaning you didn't pay the fee with credit/debit card before filing). Your refund status can be checked at their site if your refund is being transferred from them: https://cisc.sbtpg.com/

What is a transcript?

A tax return transcript shows most line items from your tax return (Form 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ) as it was originally filed, including any accompanying forms and schedules. It does not reflect any changes you, your representative or the IRS made after the return was filed. In many cases, a return transcript will meet the requirements of lending institutions such as those offering mortgages and for applying for student loans. A tax account transcript shows any later adjustments either you or the IRS made after the tax return was filed. This transcript shows basic data, including marital status, type of return filed, adjusted gross income and taxable income.

What does IGMR think about transcripts?

Please see the various posts from our users about this topic old threads can be found on the Hot tab or in the forums. jemar707311 (admin) said: Ordering transcript can only definitively mean you exist to the IRS. However, it has been a theory around here that after transcript success, you have made some progress and are likely o get a hard DD soon. But please kep in mind that it has also been reported that after success at transcript, you could still be held up for various reasons. I just don’t want this site to ever lead someone down the road of rejoicing or exploding based on us providing “definitive” type information that could be inaccurate. Please if you are offering your advice or experience, whether it be re: transcript or any other matter, to ensure that you communicate to people that your comments are your experience or opinion. I want people to be able to come here and read everything, and then chew the information around to make their own informed decisions or theories. Please do not tell people “you should” or “that means”, without a disclaimer… lol ma4pa.igmr (mod) said: I don’t see the need to order them one reason, its a burden on an already overburdened system. While it may mean you are out of processing it doesnt mean you are getting a HDD in fact your return may still have other issues, some who have their transcripts still have no money and no HDD, others have received blank transcript with no info on them. So I don’t recommend ordering them. But the choice is yours.

What number to I call to check the status of my tax refund or speak to a human?

Many phone numbers and refund site links are listed on our Links page. If you find that any of these references are not valid or you find additional numbers/links, please send an email to us at to update it for other users too.

What is a Tax Advocate?

According to the IRS website: The Taxpayer Advocate Service is Your Voice at the IRS!

The Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) is an independent organization within the IRS. We help taxpayers who are experiencing economic harm, such as not being able to provide necessities like housing, transportation, or food; taxpayers who are seeking help in resolving problems with the IRS; and those who believe an IRS system or procedure is not working as it should. Here are ten things every taxpayer should know about TAS:

1. The Taxpayer Advocate Service is your voice at the IRS.
2. Our service is free and tailored to meet your needs.
3. You may be eligible for our help if you have tried to resolve your tax problem through normal IRS channels and have gotten nowhere, or you believe an IRS procedure just isn't working as it should.
4. The worst thing you can do is nothing at all!
5. We help taxpayers whose problems are causing financial difficulty or significant cost, including the cost of professional representation. This includes businesses as well as individuals.
6. If you qualify for our help, we’ll do everything we can to get your problem resolved. You will be assigned to one advocate who will be with you at every turn.
7, We have at least one local taxpayer advocate office in every state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. You can call your local advocate, whose number is in your phone book and in Pub. 1546, Taxpayer Advocate Service -- Your Voice at the IRS. You can also call our toll-free number at 1-877-777-4778.
8. As a taxpayer, you have rights that the IRS must abide by in its dealings with you. Our tax toolkit at www.taxpayeradvocate.irs.gov can help you understand these rights.
9. TAS also handles large-scale or systemic problems that affect many taxpayers. If you know of one of these broad issues, please report it to us through our Systemic Advocacy Management System.

Source: IRS.gov Taxpayer Advocate

What does IGMR think about Tax Payer Advocates?

According to the IRS website: The Taxpayer Advocate Service is Your Voice at the IRS!

The Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) is an independent organization within the IRS. We help taxpayers who are experiencing economic harm, such as not being able to provide necessities like housing, transportation, or food; taxpayers who are seeking help in resolving problems with the IRS; and those who believe an IRS system or procedure is not working as it should. Here are ten things every taxpayer should know about TAS:

1. The Taxpayer Advocate Service is your voice at the IRS.
2. Our service is free and tailored to meet your needs.
3. You may be eligible for our help if you have tried to resolve your tax problem through normal IRS channels and have gotten nowhere, or you believe an IRS procedure just isn't working as it should.
4. The worst thing you can do is nothing at all!
5. We help taxpayers whose problems are causing financial difficulty or significant cost, including the cost of professional representation. This includes businesses as well as individuals.
6. If you qualify for our help, we’ll do everything we can to get your problem resolved. You will be assigned to one advocate who will be with you at every turn.
7, We have at least one local taxpayer advocate office in every state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. You can call your local advocate, whose number is in your phone book and in Pub. 1546, Taxpayer Advocate Service -- Your Voice at the IRS. You can also call our toll-free number at 1-877-777-4778.
8. As a taxpayer, you have rights that the IRS must abide by in its dealings with you. Our tax toolkit at www.taxpayeradvocate.irs.gov can help you understand these rights.
9. TAS also handles large-scale or systemic problems that affect many taxpayers. If you know of one of these broad issues, please report it to us through our Systemic Advocacy Management System.

Source: IRS.gov Taxpayer Advocate

I need help with rent or utilities, where can I find financial assistance while waiting for my refund?

How can I find out the status of my state income tax?

State Income Tax Info:

Alabama 800-558-3912

Arizona 602-255-3381 or 800-352-4090

Arkansas 501-682-0200 or 800-438-1992

California 800-852-5711

Colorado 303-238-3278

Connecticut 860-297-5962

Delaware 302-577-8784

Florida 850-488-8937

Georgia 877-423-6711

Hawaii 808-587-4242

Idaho 208-334-7660

Illinois 800-732-8866

Indiana 317-232-2240

Iowa 515-281-4966

Kansas 800-894-0318

Kentucky 502-564-1600

Louisiana 225-219-0102

Maine 207-626-8475

Maryland 800-218-8160

Massachusetts 800-392-6089

Michigan 517-373-3200

Minnesota 651-296-3781

Mississippi 601-923-7801

Missouri 573-526-8299

Montana 866-859-2254

Nebraska 800-742-7474

New Mexico 505-476-3778

New York 518-457-5149

North Carolina 877-252-4052

North Dakota 701-328-2770

Ohio 800-282-1780

Oklahoma 405-521-3160 or 800-522-8165 (in-state toll free)

Oregon 503-378-4988

Pennsylvania 717-787-8201

Rhode Island 801-297-2200

South Carolina

Utah 801-297-2200

Vermont 802-828-0145

Virginia 804-367-2486

West Virginia 304-558-3333

Wisconsin 866-947-7363

When does WMR update?

WMR updates daily with mass updates on Sundays and Wednesdays.

Why has the amount of my refund been reduced?

If an individual owes money to the federal government because of a delinquent debt, the Treasury Department can offset that individual's federal payment or withhold the entire amount to satisfy the debt. The debtor is notified in advance of any offset action to be taken. Individuals may call (800) 304-3107 with questions about a delinquent debt.

My spouse and I filed a joint tax return and our refund was offset for a debt that my spouse owes. What must I do to receive my portion of the refund?

Complete IRS Form 8379, which you can obtain by calling the IRS toll-free at (800) 829-3676 or by downloading the form from the IRS Web site at Link For assistance with completing the form, call your local IRS office or the IRS toll-free number (800) 829-1040.

What is the “one liner” people talk about on WMR?

Your tax return has been received and is being processed.

When is the WMR available?

Where’s My Refund? is available almost all of the time. However, our system is not available every Monday, early, from 12:00 am (Midnight) to 3:00 am Eastern Time. Change of Address and Refund Trace features are not available during the following times (Eastern Time): Sunday 12:00 am (Midnight) to 7:00 pm Monday 12:00 am (Midnight) to 6:00 am Tuesday 3:30 am to 6:00 am Wednesday 3:30 am to 6:00 am Thursday 3:30 am to 6:00 am Friday 3:30 am to 6:00 am Saturday 3:30 am to 6:00 am and 9:00 pm to Midnight

How do I request Audit Reconsideration?

If you decide to request audit reconsideration, please send your request to the address of the IRS Campus shown on your Examination Report. Andover Campus Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 9053 Stop 823 Andover, MA 01810-0953 Phone 1-866-897-0177 Atlanta Campus Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 48-389 Stop 54A Doraville, GA 30362 Phone 1-866-897-0177 Austin Campus Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 934 Stop 4103 Austin, TX 78767 Phone 1-866-897-0177 Brookhaven Campus Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 9005 Stop 611, Team 406 Holtsville, NY 11742 Phone 1-866- 897-0161 Cincinnati Campus Internal Revenue Service CIRSC P.O. Box 308 Stop 8202 Covington, KY 41012 Phone 1-866-897-0161 Kansas City Campus Internal Revenue Service P3 Stop 4200 Kansas City, MO 64999 Phone 1-866-897-0177 Fresno Campus Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 12067 Stop 82206 Fresno, CA 93776 Phone 1-866-897-0177 Memphis Campus Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 30086 Stop 8236 Memphis, TN 38130-0086 Phone 1-866-897-0161 Ogden Campus Internal Revenue Service P.O. Box 9036 Stop 4440 Ogden, UT 84201 Phone 1-866-897-0161 Philadelphia Campus Internal Revenue Service Exam Recon, M/S 4-E08-141 2970 Market Street Philadelphia, PA 19104 Phone 1-866-897-0161 Source: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p3598.pdf

What is an HDD versus a DD?

These terms are thrown around when discussing the dates provided by the WMR. HDD was coined as "hard direct deposit" because the language from WMR says something about "your refund will be deposited on XX" and trends tell us that this is usually a firm (hard) date that doesn't hange and pretty accurate. A DD (direct deposit) date however is used to describe the various dates WMR spits out: "refund will be processed by...". We look at DD dates as more of ballpark and they are often changed with various WMR messages and also your refund is usually not deposited on a DD date. The good news happy dance is for when you see a HDD because you likely can count on it being close to the day you will get your refund.

 

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