Will You Need a Taxpayer Advocate (TA)?

Prayer method, I hope, carries us through this tax season; and, I also hope that people will not need to contact tax advocates this year to help navigate a tax fiasco some taxpayers experience.  But all of taxpayer have rights.  If the process of receiving your refund becomes a problem with the IRS and you need help beyond the people answering the phones at the IRS, you might need to contact your local Taxpayer Advocate.  Theses folks act as a voice for taxpayers to ensure we understand our rights and we are treated fairly.  Moreover, it’s a free service of highly qualified and knowledgable tax professionals when you need a third party on your side.  The taxpayer advocates work closely with IRS and if you are facing serious financial hardship as a result of repeated unsuccessful attempts to resolve directly with the IRS, the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) recommends that you reach out to them.  They encourage people to call and say that the worst thing you can do is to do nothing when you need help.  From what I read at igotmyrefund.com, TA’s helped a lot of people last year when tracking refunds became a tumultuous process.  They claim to stick by your side to get to the bottom of tax cases.  It has been said that after a verification process to to show you truly have a hardship, people are happy with with results yielded from getting the help of a TA.

Resources For You:

  • An IRS publication tells you how to contact an advocate or you can lookup contact info at the IRS website:  click here for a TAS state lookup tool.
  • The hotline number for TAS questions is 1-877-777-4778 and to find the local office closest you.
  • You can also request a taxpayer advocate by filing IRS form 911.
  • The IRS website to get more info is here: IRS Advocate link
  • Click on this brochure link to read more about the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS).  Most of the state level TAS offices are listed at then end of the brochure document.
  • This TAS website link also has a wealth of info for you to browse as well.
POST YOUR ACTUAL TAX REFUND EXPERIENCE HERE: This is a “user to user” site and the primary mode of support is peer-to-peer, meaning users helping other users. Admin and moderators are not always present or may not have answers to questions. Users becomes more informed when they are here often to read and comment. We call them Top Contributors. We are not a group of experts, merely individuals who have learned more than we ever wanted to know about the tax refund process.

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What Others Are Saying:

  1. Anonymous

        I called a tax advocate because I filed in January 11 and was except on the 12. I waited 21 days just to find out I had to do I D verified I verified my identity and was told I had to wait 6 to 9 weeks but I couldn’t wait that long cause I’m behind on my bills but I contacted a tax advocate and she told me I had to verify my employment with my last check stub from 2015 so I fax it to her then she called me March 1, 2016 and told me the IRS had 5 to 10 to respond and that I should have my money by the third week in march don’t know how true it is but fingers crossed I’m at the end of my rope any suggestions… Please

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